Indicators are facts that help show how a region is doing, the way the unemployment rate helps show the health of the economy. Measuring these kinds of data helps communities to identify existing conditions, measure progress toward goals and to mobilize action to improve the region.  The Long Island Index has been providing this data for ten years which allows residents, researchers, civic organizations and others to assess our change over time and evaluate our path for future action.

1

Economy

For most of the postwar period, Long Island’s economy was driven by two powerful engines – income flowing to commuters from jobs in Manhattan, and a large defense industry fueled by Washington DC.  Now, prosperity comes from many sources, and Long Island needs to look for more of its income to be generated from within its own boundaries.  
Gmp
1 of 8
Gross Metropolitan Product
Long Island’s economy contracted during the recession, but shows signs of growth in the past three years. Growth has lagged behind overall U.S. GDP in the last two years.

Read More

Average-annual-employment
2 of 8
Employment Trends
Long Island’s private sector employment has declined by 9% since 2007.

Read More

Average-pay-per-employee
3 of 8
Growth in Wages over the Past 10 Years
Long Island wages show a slight downward trend, while converging with U.S. wages which have risen slightly since the recession.

Read More

Industryclus1
4 of 8
Industry Clusters
Employment declines continue following the recession.  The largest employment losses occurred in the highest-paying sectors.

Read More

Venture-cap-investment
5 of 8
Venture Capital Financing
Long Island firms receive relatively little venture capital, although there was an increase in 2010.

Read More

Sbir1
6 of 8
Federal Small Business Innovation Research Technology Transfer Awards to Long Island
Small technology companies on Long Island remain competitive in attracting federal funding under the SBIR/STTR programs, which directly supports the private sector in the development and commercialization of innovative and early-stage technologies with significant potential for financial, economic and societal impact.

Read More

Thumb
7 of 8
Retail Space
Changes in retail space provide an insight to regional economic activity over time.   Key indicators include vacancy rates, rental rates and net absorption rates which measures whether the current inventory level is shrinking or growing.  

Read More

Household-income-distributi
8 of 8
Household Income Distribution
2012 Household income rebounds for the affluent but continues to decline for the poor.

Read More

2

Population

The Island today is a far more diverse place than either its past or current images portray. Along with the rest of America, this trend has been growing for decades. The pace of change, however, has been particularly rapid in the last 20 years.
1li-pop
1 of 1
Long Island’s Changing Population
Long Island continued to slowly add residents through the recession and its aftermath.

Read More

3

Housing

Long Island is falling behind its suburban neighbors in both the number of new homes and the variety of housing types being built.  This has serious implications for our younger generation looking for rentals, condos, or other non-single family homes and for any family looking for more affordable opportunities.
Ha1
1 of 1
Housing Affordability
Housing prices have stabilized in the last two years, with the average single-family home selling for $365,000.

Read More

4

Education

While Long Island schools do well on average, there are wide disparities among schools depending on the neighborhoods they serve.  Blacks and Hispanics are concentrated in high-poverty schools, perpetuating the economic disparities among racial and ethnic groups.
Cr1
1 of 7
College Readiness
Our measure of college readiness reflects mastery of the New York State High School Curriculum. It indicates the percentage of scores in a school at 85% or better across numerous state-wide Regent’s examinations, including English, Chemistry, Physics, US History, Global History, and the two highest-level Mathematics exams.

Read More

Er1
2 of 7
Academic Performance: 4th Grade and 8th Grade
Schools are ultimately about student performance and below we provide several indicators that measure performance throughout the educational queue, including 4th grade English and math, 8th grade English and math, and a composite measure of “college readiness” which reflects student scores across numerous high school Regent’s examinations.

Read More

Te1
3 of 7
Teacher Education and Turnover
The demographics of a school are not solely based on the students; teachers also contribute to the social environment. We look at three indicators about teachers in a school: The percentage that are “highly educated,” the annual turnover rate among all teachers, and the turnover rate among “new” teachers (those with fewer than five years of experience).

Read More

Ss1
4 of 7
Student Stability
Another aspect that measures the school environment is student stability. As reported by each school, it is the percent of students in a school’s highest grade who were enrolled in the same school the previous year.

Read More

Re1
5 of 7
Race and Ethnicity
The racial and ethnic composition of Long Island schools is also noteworthy as Long Island remains one of the most residentially segregated areas of the United States.

Read More

Ela1
6 of 7
English Language Learners
Limited English proficiency can be another obstacle to learning, as English language learners (ELL) not only have to attempt mastery over the curriculum, but they also have do it in a non-native tongue.

Read More

Schoolpoverty1
7 of 7
School Poverty
A high quality education remains the surest route to upward mobility in American Society. The good jobs in our modern economy require high levels of education. For most children, public schools provide the underpinnings for workforce readiness and higher education.

Read More

5

Environment

Long Island’s sole source aquifer system provides the Island’s residents with 100% of their drinking water.  Both the quality and quantity of the water in this underground aquifer system is directly impacted by what we do on the surface. Currently, Long Island is experiencing a rapid rise in contaminants in our aquifer system.
Voc
1 of 1
Water Quality
Long Island is experiencing a rapid rise in contaminants in our aquifer system and in our surface waters.

Read More

6

Open Space

Almost two-thirds of Long Island’s land surface is covered with buildings, pavement and other man-made structures.  In 2006, New York State set a goal of preserving 37,000 acres within 10 years’ time.  By 2010, only 18% of the target acreage has been preserved.
Land-preservation
1 of 1
Land Preserved
It is virtually guaranteed that Long Island will not meet its goal to preserve 10% of the Island’s land mass as open space and farmland by 2016.

Read More

7

Governance

More so than other regions, Long Island has unusually high numbers of governmental entities providing a range of local services.  Not only does this make governance more complicated, it also contributes to the high cost of living and doing business.
Annual-percent-change-in-expenditures
1 of 1
Local Government Expenditures
The growth in local government costs has slowed substantially since 2008.

Read More

8

Health

Health care continues to be a crucial issue for Long Islanders.  Ensuring that all residents, children and adult, have access to quality care that they can afford is an essential ingredient in the social fabric.  While the overall picture on average appears to be positive, that there are also significant signs of polarized inequality with respect to the health of our population and access to quality care.
Overall-payor-mix
1 of 2
Paying for Healthcare Costs
Healthcare costs are a major factor in almost every household budget. Costs associated with a single hospital stay may quickly wipe out savings and move people into debt. Thus, having some reliable and comfortable way of covering major medical expenses is an important element in preserving our quality of life.

Read More

Infant-health-risk-indicato
2 of 2
Perinatal Risk
Health care continues to be a crucial issue for Long Islanders. Ensuring that all residents, children and adult, have access to quality care that they can afford is an essential ingredient in the social fabric.

Read More

9

Transportation

Increased transit ridership helps reduce traffic congestion by taking motor vehicles off the road.  An efficient transit system can provide quicker access to jobs, reduce air pollution and help to improve the overall livability of our communities.   Yet while other suburban regions have been expanding their public transportation options including reverse commutes, Long Island has added no new capacity.
Changerider1
1 of 1
Transit Ridership
The LIRR’s three year decline in ridership come to an end in 2012 with the railroad serving just under 82 million passengers, up from 81 million.

Read More

10

Safety Net

For both individuals and for families, the experience of economic hardship places greater strains on the quality of life in many aspects.  The ability to obtain adequate shelter, nutrition, clothing and education are directly tied to one’s economic situation.  On Long Island, as in most areas of the country, there has been a steep rise in rates of poverty as well as number of families requiring Food Stamps.
Percentage-of-li-below-pove
1 of 2
Poverty
Poverty rates increase dramatically. For both individuals and for families, the experience of economic hardship places greater strains on the quality of life in many aspects. The ability to obtain adequate shelter, nutrition, clothing, and education are directly tied to one’s economic situation.

Read More

Percentage-of-li-households
2 of 2
Hunger
Reliance on Food Stamps rises sharply. The existence of a growing population of people without reliable access to adequate nutritious food is a major national concern.

Read More